OTTAWA, ON – It’s a major victory for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal government, one that won’t sit too well with Alberta.

In a 6-3 decision Wednesday morning, Canada’s highest court ruled the federal carbon tax is indeed constitutional.

The court decided Ottawa did not overstep its authority by imposing the often controversial tax on provinces that had no plans to price emissions.

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled there was nothing unconstitutional about federal Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act passed in 2018.

Federal Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson says this ruling affirms that carbon pricing in integral to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and responding to the threat of climate change.

Ontario, Saskatchewan and Alberta had been fighting the legislation arguing the federal law interfered with provinces’ rights to develop their own natural resources.

As expected, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is disappointed. He says Alberta will continue to fight to protect the province’s right to regulate its resource industries.

“We are going to consult with Albertans and also talk to our allied provinces to determine the best way forward and to protect jobs and the economy in Alberta,” stated Kenney Thursday.

The federal carbon price applies in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario and is applied on the cost of buying fuels, from gasoline and diesel to coal and natural gas.