Monday, September 26, 2022

Student-developed exhibition showcases local media history at the Galt

The Galt Museum and Archives has a revamped permanent exhibition focused on the history and importance of media in Lethbridge. It was made possible by Cassandra Williamson, a University of Lethbridge Art history and museum studies student. She researched the history of media in the city and transformed it into interpretive panels for visitors. The research is accompanied by photographs and artifacts from the museum’s collection.

Cassandra Williamson (left) revamped the Galt Museum’s exhibition on local news during her internship. (Photo by Tyler Hay)

“It feels great to see the space renewed with more information, more new things to read about and new artifacts to look at. I hope when people visit they get a chance to think back on how media has changed,” Williamson said. She added there were already artifacts and research from temporary exhibitions the museum had run, so she combined them with her original research for the new fixture. 

Devon Smither, associate professor of art history and museum studies at the U of L, said internships like this provide students with valuable hands-on experience, which help to find employment after graduation. 

Tyler Stewart, curator at the Galt, said the exhibition revamp would not have been possible without Williamson’s internship.

- Advertisement -

“It’s a really great opportunity for us to work with the museum studies program at the University of Lethbridge and have a fantastic student like Cass to help us bring these stories to life,” he said. “Our permanent exhibit space is something that doesn’t change a lot so having extra capacity from a student like Cass to help us do extra research and storytelling and exhibit development is such a fantastic partnership and collaboration for us.”

Williamson said the original display focused on newspaper, but she wanted to explore all forms of media in the city. The exhibition redevelopment features artifacts that have not been on public display, including the camera of local photographer Vernon Decoux, who documented many critical events in Crowsnest Pass history. There is also a hand-made radio transmitter built by John “Jock” Palmer, the founder of CJOC Radio.

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -